Ballast Blog – Invader of the Week – Cyanobacteria

Malin Group Ballast Blog

This weeks article looks at the blue-green algae known as cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteriea is a type of photosynthetic bacteria which can be found in almost every terrestrial and aquatic habitat on earth. Though not an invasive species strictly speaking, they can be considered a particularly troublesome side effect of other invasive species.

How to Choose a Ballast Water Treatment System: the Do’s and Don’ts

Malin Group Ballast Blog

With the number of ballast water treatment systems on the market ever on the increase, one would think that it would be fairly straightforward to find one that is suitable. Sadly though, choosing the right BWTS for a vessel is a task that couldn’t be further from ‘straightforward.’ The list of factors to weigh up before making a decision is enough to leave even the most experienced in the industry with a headache. We hope that you find this short list of do’s and don’ts helpful. Don’t: 1. Pick a system based on price alone. The price may make some …

Ballast Blog – Invader of the Week – Australian Spotted Jellyfish

Malin Group Ballast Blog

This weeks aquatic hitch hiker is native to the Western Pacific and Eastern Indian Ocean however, since their initial discovery in the waters of California in 1981, swarms of this species can now be found worldwide. They start out in life as tiny polyps, and can grow to be over 20 inches and weigh up to 11 kilograms. It’s thought that the polyps are transported around the globe in ships ballast water.

Despite not being deadly to humans, the Australian spotted jellyfish causes plenty of damage wherever it goes walkabout……

Ballast Blog – Invader of the Week – Quagga Mussel

Malin Group Ballast Blog

This week’s invader of the week is the Quagga Mussel

The Quagga Mussel (Dreissena Rostriformis Bugensis) is a species of mussel native to the Black and Caspian seas, thought to have been transported to Western Europe and North America through ships’ ballast water. Whilst not posing a direct predatory threat to local species, the Quagga Mussel does significantly disrupt the local aquatic lifecylce due to its prodigious filtering of the local water of important phytoplankton and suspended particulates, with each mussel capable of filtering up to one litre of water per day. The Quagga Mussel’s tenacious breeding abilities make it a significant economic threat to industrial and civil areas.

Ballast Blog – Invader of the Week – Killer Shrimp

Malin Group Ballast Blog

This week’s invader of the week is the Killer Shrimp.

The Killer Shrimp (Dikerogammarus Villosus) is actually an amphipod, rather than a shrimp, but earns its reputation from its aggressive and vicious behaviour. Native to the Black and Caspian seas, it is thought to have been transported to Western Europe and, most recently, the United Kingdom via the ballast water and hulls of ships.